Don Garron : a charro of many trades

Don Garron´s charro suit embroidered with his name on his tie
Don Garron wears many hats. First, he´s 100% charro. He is also a vet. He´s a chef of traditional Mexican food. He´s also a photographer.

The Art of the Escaramuza discovered Don Garron dishing out tacos at rodeo events around the capital city, dressed in his signature charro suit and being his warm, hearty self with his patrons.

Meet Don Garron in this short audiovisual made during an escaramuza fair in Mexico City where the escaramuza was born : El Rancho Charro, or the National Association of Charros.

For English subtitles, after clicking ¨play,¨then click the CC at the bottom right of the youtube window.

Girlfriends of charreria


Hay una gran competencia entre los atletas en todos los deportes, pero todos comparten el amor por un mismo deporte, en este caso: la escaramuza.  María José Peña, una mujer Mexicana a caballo que monta con el equipo Escaramuza Rancho La Joya, nos explica brevemente el ambiente que reina en las competencias y el papel de la mujer en la charrería, el deporte nacional Mexicano.   Este reportaje fue realizado en el lienzo charro La Tapatía donde los equipos compitieron para calificar para el Congreso Nacional de charreria. Fierce competition among the athletes is natural, but they all share a love for the same sport, in this case: the escaramuza.

María José Peña, a Mexican female horse rider who is part of the escaramuza team Rancho La Joya, explains the atmosphere that pervades the competitions and the role of women in charreria, Mexico´s national sport.

The below audiovisual was made at the rodeo club La Tapatia in Mexico City where team competed to qualify for the national charreria competition, charreria´s highest event of the year.

For English subtitles, after clicking ¨play,¨then click the CC at the bottom right of the youtube window.



The Queens of Charreria

queen of la villa charreria rodeo club in 2014 in mexico city
Samantha Mayorga Castillo, center right, wears the queen´s sombrero during
the gala ceremony and dinner where she was named Queen of La Villa
charreria rodeo club.
Charreria clubs across Mexico select a new ¨queen¨ every year.

Instead of a crown she wears an elegant sombrero, and becomes the club´s social and cultural representative. It´s work and an honor.

This year Samantha Mayorga Castillo is one of the hundreds of horsewomen to take on the job at her local rodeo club, in her case at La Villa in Mexico City.

Like many of Mexico´s women of charreria, she was born into a charro family and has been riding on escaramuza teams since she was 15.

charrs dance in their wheelchairs at the crowning ceremony for Samantha Mayorga Catillo at la villa charreria association in mexico city
A charra and charro dance in their wheelchairs at the gala where Mayorga
was named queen of La Villa.
Mayorga, a 26-year-old chemical engineer who works in Mexico´s oil industry, says she most wants to promote and support paracharreria : rodeo performed by horsemen and women who are incapacitated in some way.

Below is a short audiovisual from the ceremony where she became queen, in which Mayorga tells us what it means for her.





For English subtitles, after clicking ¨play,¨then click the CC at the bottom right of the youtube window.